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White Doberman Pinscher/Oculocutaneous Albinism    

WDP/OCA Test                                                         Code 315

For breeds: Doberman Pinscher

OptiGen is pleased to offer a DNA test for the White Doberman Pinscher (WDP) mutation that causes oculocutaneous albinism and associated health concerns including photopobia and melanocytic tumors. The discovery of the WDP mutation was made by Dr. Paige Winkler and team in Dr. Bartoe's research laboratory at Michigan State University. Dr. Winkler has provided OptiGen with support in establishing the WDP test and she offers this perspective on the history and incidence of the WDP mutation in the breed:
Recessively inherited oculocutaneous albinism in Doberman pinschers is caused by a mutation in the SLC45A2 gene and results in the coat-color commonly known as "white". Two copies of the mutant gene must be present in order for a Doberman's coat to be white. Padula's Queen Sheba was the first registered white Doberman. Sheba had to inherit two copies of the "white" mutation, one from Rasputin VI and one from Dynamo Humm. In addition to Sheba, both of her parents may have passed the "white" mutation to any of their other offspring. None of these offspring were white, but they could have been carriers which would have allowed them to transmit copies of the "white" mutation to subsequent generations.

Sheba's parents do not show close line breeding, based on her pedigree, and therefore the "white" mutation is thought to have been present in the Doberman pinscher breed for at least 5 generations before Queen Sheba was born. The "white" mutation did originate from a single dog some time before the birth of Sheba, and subsequent breeding from this founder dog replicated the mutation, which was passed down through the generations until two copies were eventually inherited by Queen Sheba. Because this ancestor preceded Sheba, Doberman pinschers that are not direct descendants of Sheba (and therefore not on the "Z-list") could still possibly carry the "white" mutation.

The Z list was created to track potential carriers of the "white" mutation. Having Queen Sheba in the pedigree indicates the possibility of carrier status but cannot guarantee this, nor can the fact that a Doberman pinscher is not a direct descendant of Sheba guarantee a particular dog is not a carrier. The odds that an individual Doberman which is not a direct relative of Queen Sheba is a carrier of the "white" mutation are expected to be relatively low because the white color was not identified for selective breeding in other pedigrees. Nevertheless, a DNA test that identifies the presence or absence of the "white" mutation is the only way to be certain of carrier status.

Breeding Strategies: In order to avoid producing WDP/OCA affected offspring, at least one parent of any litter should be DNA tested and shown to be Normal/Clear of the WDP mutation. 

Expected results for breeding strategies using the
mutation test for WDP/OCA
Parent 1
Genotype
Parent 2 Genotype
Normal/ClearCarrierAffected
Normal/ClearAll = Normal/Clear1/2 = Normal/Clear
1/2 = Carrier
All = Carrier
Carrier1/2 = Normal
1/2 = Carrier
1/4 = Normal/Clear
1/2 = Carrier
1/4 = Affected
1/2 = Carrier
1/2 = Affected
Affected All = Carrier
1/2 = Carrier
1/2 = Affected
All = Affected

Reference:

  1. Winkler et al. A Partial Gene Deletion of SLC45A2 Causes Oculocutaneous Albinism in Doberman Pinscher Dogs. 2014. PLoS One 9(3) e92127

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Tel: 607 257 0301 · Fax: 607 257 0353 · email: genetest@optigen.com or optigen@clarityconnect.com
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