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Exercise Induced Collapse       EIC Test     Code 356

Test Pricing

For breeds*: American Cocker Spaniel, Bouvier des Flanders, Boykin Spaniel, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Curly Coated Retriever, English Cocker Spaniel, German Wirehaired Pointer, Labrador Retriever, Old English Sheepdog, Pembroke Welsh Corgi  

*Please note that, upon request of the owner, OptiGen also provides EIC testing to breeds not listed above.  

Clinical signs/Disease description:   The syndrome of exercise-induced collapse (EIC) in dogs is manifested by muscle weakness, incoordination and complete loss of control of the limbs after five to fifteen minutes of strenuous exercise. Dogs suffering from such condition develop a wobbly gait which soon progresses to non-painful paralysis of the rear limbs and may include all four limbs. Collapse episodes usually last for 5-10 minutes; within 30 minutes there is often complete recovery, but occasionally such episodes can be fatal.  

EIC mutation test:   Researchers form University of Minnesota have identified a mutation in the dynamin 1 gene (DNM1) that has high association with EIC [1]. Out of a total 104 Labrador Retrievers with recurrent EIC, 101 dogs (97%) were homozygous for DNM1 mutation. In the group of dogs with a single reported collapse, or atypical collapse, about 50% were homozygous for DNM1 mutation. Out of total 132 dogs without the history of collapse 12 (9%) were homozygous for the DNM1 mutation, which may be explained by them not being exposed to sufficient exercise to induce collapse, or the possibility of genetic and/or environmental modifying factors that diminish the presentation of EIC.   DNM1 mutation is present at a high frequency in the USA population of Labrador Retrievers. Out of 400 tested dogs that were collected at the field trials in the upper Midwest region of USA, 3% were homozygous for the mutation and 37% were carriers. The DNM1 mutation has also been observed in Labrador Retrievers from Europe, the Middle East and Australia, as well as in some other breeds [1, 2].   The DNA-based EIC test has been developed to identify the individuals that might be at high risk of developing the disease or hereditarily transmitting it to the next generation.  

Testing/Breeding recommendations:
EIC is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait, which means that individuals with two copies of the DNM1 mutation, inherited from both parents, are at the highest risk of developing EIC. Carriers of only one copy of the mutation are not expected to develop the disease but will pass the mutation to their offspring.

The EIC test allows genotype determination of a tested dog and yields results of Normal/Clear, Carrier or Homozygous Affected. For detailed recommendations on breeding strategies using results of OptiGen testing, please refer to the chart below.

Expected results for breeding strategies using the
EIC Test

Parent 1
Genotype
Parent 2 Genotype
Normal/ClearCarrierAffected
Normal/ClearAll = Normal/Clear1/2 = Normal/Clear
1/2 = Carrier
All = Carrier
Carrier1/2 = Normal
1/2 = Carrier
1/4 = Normal/Clear
1/2 = Carrier
1/4 = Affected
1/2 = Carrier
1/2 = Affected
Affected All = Carrier
1/2 = Carrier
1/2 = Affected
All = Affected

 

References:

1. Patterson EE, Minor KM, Tchernatynskaia AV, Taylor SM, Shelton GD, Ekenstedt KJ, Mickelson JR. A canine DNM1 mutation is highly associated with the syndrome of exercise-induced collapse. Nature Genetics. 2008. Vol. 40 (10): 1237-39.

2.  Minor KM, Patterson EE, Keating MK, Gross SD, Ekenstedt KJ, Taylor SM, Mickelson JR. Presence and impact of the Exercise-induced collapse associated DNM1 mutation in Labrador retrievers and other breeds. Vet J. 2011 V.189 (2): 214-9.

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Tel: 607 257 0301 · Fax: 607 257 0353 · email: genetest@optigen.com or optigen@clarityconnect.com
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